jolisphinx:



"The first image you saw in this post, of the T. rex sleeping, is another thing you basically never see in paleoart. We always witness T. rex chomping on its prey. And yet predators spend most of their days sleeping and digesting, preparing for the next high-energy hunt. So your typical T. rex pose would probably have been more like that adorable cat curl than a bloody fight.”


All Yesterdays: Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric Animals by paleoartists C.M. Kosemen and John Conway 
 


Beautiful but the anatomy is a bit off

jolisphinx:

"The first image you saw in this post, of the T. rex sleeping, is another thing you basically never see in paleoart. We always witness T. rex chomping on its prey. And yet predators spend most of their days sleeping and digesting, preparing for the next high-energy hunt. So your typical T. rex pose would probably have been more like that adorable cat curl than a bloody fight.”

All Yesterdays: Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric Animals by paleoartists C.M. Kosemen and John Conway 

 

Beautiful but the anatomy is a bit off

124 notes

reptilesrevolution:

Spiny-tailed monitor in western Australia. 
Photo by Ollie Neuman.

reptilesrevolution:

Spiny-tailed monitor in western Australia.

Photo by Ollie Neuman.

44 notes

twicr:

The soundtrack to my nightmares about the looming robopocalypse is played by this creepy robot band. 

44 notes

sylph0fl1ght asked: Why do hyenas eat wildebeest face? What is even the point of eating the face?

cambriancupcake:

Bites to the face are very effective for killing prey, as I’m sure you might’ve guessed. Face muscles are, to my knowledge, not particulary rich in nutrients but the tongue, brain, and throat are all in that region and seem to be favorites of a lot of predatory animals. The reasons behind this aren’t something I’m familiar with though, to be honest.

1 note